TPG NBN: Plans, pricing and everything you need to know

Your one-stop spot for all of the essential need-to-know info about TPG NBN in terms of plans, pricing and modems.

April 19, 2022
5 min read

Back in the ADSL2+ heyday, TPG quickly found a name for itself as a no-nonsense provider with competitive pricing and unlimited-data plans. Fast-forward to NBN-dominant times and TPG still tends to favour unlimited-data plans and competitive pricing.

In their cheapest form, you get NBN internet via a BYO option. If you don’t mind spending more, you can also nab a PAYG phone service and NBN-compatible modem. Let’s take a closer look at what TPG NBN has to offer.

Photograph of a woman opening a purple gift while using her mobile phone and internet

TPG NBN connection types

NBN plans from TPG are available in metro with fixed-line NBN as well as rural and regional areas via Fixed Wireless NBN. Here’s a quick look at the NBN technologies that TPG sells plans for:

Those living in metro areas with homes connected to the NBN via fixed-line technologies can sign up for all NBN plans up to NBN 100. Only homes serviced by FTTP and HFC can sign up for TPG’s NBN 250 and NBN 1000 plans. While Fixed Wireless NBN plans are available from other providers in NBN 12, NBN 25 and NBN 50 speed tiers, TPG only sells plans for the NBN 25 option.

TPG NBN plans

TPG is a rare NBN provider that sells plans on all NBN speed tiers, meaning you can sign up for bare-bolts internet on an NBN 12 plan or go all out (if you’re in an FTTP or HFC home) with NBN 1000. Let’s start with TPG’s NBN 12 plan first, which is really only meant for homes with the most basic internet needs.

There aren’t many providers in our comparison engine that sell NBN 12 plans, but you can see the popular picks in the list below.

NBN 25 is what we consider to be the true entry-level broadband speed tier, which is an affordable way for a couple of users to enjoy most of the activities the internet has to offer at okay speeds. You can see TPG’s cheapest NBN 25 plan below.

There’s a lot more provider competition for NBN 25 plans, and you can see the most popular picks from our comparison engine below.

NBN 50 is the most popular speed tier in Australia with good reason: it offers a solid mix of speed and versatility without being overly expensive. TPG’s NBN 50 plan is below.

For comparison, check out popular NBN 50 plans from our database that come with unlimited data.

Most metro homes in Australia can sign up for an NBN 100 plan, which offer download speeds up to twice as fast as NBN 50. Because of this, NBN 100 plans are meant for homes with five or more people who likely love to simultaneously stream, game online and download files. Check out TPG’s NBN 100 plan below.

If you’re interested in signing up for an NBN 100 plan, check out the popular picks from our comparison engine below.

NBN 250 plans are for streaming-heavy, gamer-centric homes or abodes with lots of people who don’t like to compromise on bandwidth when it comes to sharing their ’net. Granted, NBN 250 plans are only available to FTTP and HFC homes. You can see TPG’s NBN 250 plan below.

These speedier NBN 250 plans are becoming increasingly popular, and you can check out popular picks from our comparison engine below.

The other speed tier available in Australia is also the fastest: NBN 1000. These plans are only available to FTTP and select HFC homes, but their blistering download speeds are best for homes with many inhabitants who all have big bandwidth needs. Check out TPG’s NBN 1000 plan below.

While only available to certain homes, NBN 1000 plans are becoming more common. You can see a daily updating list of popular picks from our comparison engine below.

For those in rural and regional areas, TPG also sells NBN Fixed Wireless plans on the NBN 25 speed tier.

Below is a daily updating list of popular NBN Fixed Wireless plans (on the NBN 25 speed tier) for comparison.

TPG NBN speed test

TPG NBN speeds range from great to decent the higher up the speed tiers you climb. Check out your TPG NBN speeds below (this test also works for other NBN providers and even on mobile plans).

TPG NBN modems

You can BYO modem with the cheapest TPG NBN plans but you can also opt for a preconfigured TPG NBN modem, which will be one of these three options:

  • TP-Link VR1600v
  • Huawei HG659
  • Huawei HG658

Handily, TPG also provides configuration guides for the following NBN-compatible modems:

  • Netcomm NF4V
  • Netgear Nighthawk D7000
  • Netgear Nighthawk D7800
  • D-Link DSL-4320L
  • D-Link DSL-3900
  • D-Link DSL-2878
  • D-Link DSL-G225
  • TP-Link Archer VR900
  • Fritz! Box 7390
  • Fritz! Box 7490

TPG NBN modem setup guides

TP-Link VR1600v setup

Follow these steps to get online with the TP-Link VR1600v, but also note that not all of these steps may be required as the device should arrive pre-configured:

  • Connect the TP-Link VR1600v to a power outlet.
  • FTTN and FTTB users should connect a telephone cable to the DSL port and then the other end to the NBN wall socket.
  • FTTP, FTTC, HFC and Fixed Wireless users should connect an Ethernet cable to the blue WAN port on the TP-Link VR1600v and the other end to the UNI-D port on the NBN connection box.
  • Optionally, connect a telephone handset to the Phone1 port on the TP-Link VR1600v.
  • TPG recommends connecting a computer to the TP-Link VR1600v via Ethernet cable for configuration. Alternatively, use the provided WiFi details (on the sticker underneath the TP-Link VR1600v) to connect a device wirelessly.
  • Open a web browser and input http://192.168.1.1 into the address bar to connect to the TP-Link VR1600v configuration screen. Use ‘admin’ for both username and password.
  • FTTN and FTTB users should click on the ‘Advanced’ tab, then select ‘Network’ and then ‘DSL’. Click the ‘Edit’ button next to the ‘pppoe_ptm_2_0_d’ entry. Now enter your provided TPG username and password details, then click ‘Save’. Click back on the ‘Basic’ tab.
  • Optionally, click on the ‘Wireless’ tab if you’d like to change your WiFi network name (SSID) and password. Save any changes.
  • Connect the devices in your home via Ethernet or WiFi to get online.

You can find a complete TP-Link VR1600v guide here (in PDF form).

Huawei HG659 and Huawei HG658 setup

Follow these steps to get online with the Huawei HG659 and Huawei HG658, but not all of these steps may be required as the device should arrive pre-configured:

  • Connect the Huawei modem-router to a power outlet.
  • FTTN and FTTB users should connect a telephone cable to the DSL port and then the other end to the NBN wall socket.
  • FTTP, FTTC, HFC and Fixed Wireless users should connect an Ethernet cable to the blue WAN port on the Huawei modem-router and the other end to the UNI-D port on the NBN connection box.
  • Optionally, connect a telephone handset to the Phone1 port on the Huawei modem-router.
  • TPG recommends connecting a computer to the Huawei modem-router via Ethernet cable for configuration. Alternatively, use the provided WiFi details (on the sticker underneath the Huawei modem-router) to connect a device wirelessly.
  • Open a web browser and input http://192.168.1.1 into the address bar to connect to the Huawei modem-router configuration screen. Use ‘admin’ for both username and password.
  • Click ‘Start Wizard’ on the next screen then enter your TPG username and password. Click ‘Next’ to continue.
  • Optionally, change your WiFi network name (SSID) and password. Save any changes.
  • Connect the devices in your home via Ethernet or WiFi to get online.
Nathan Lawrence
Written by
Nathan Lawrence
Nathan Lawrence has been banging out passionate tech and gaming words for more than 11 years. These days, you can find his work on outlets like IGN, STACK, Fandom, Red Bull and AusGamers. Nathan adores PC gaming and the proof of his first-person-shooter prowess is at the top of a Battlefield V scoreboard.

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