The best Disney Plus TV shows in Australia

It's nearly time to relive your childhood with these Disney TV classics.
  • Gargoyles

    Best Disney Arvo Classic

    4 out of 5 overall
    Watch it now
  • The Simpsons

    Best Disney Plus show overall

    4.5 out of 5 overall
    Watch it now
  • Gravity Falls

    Best for the whole family

    4.5 out of 5 overall
    Watch it now
Recent Updates: 2 months ago
After Disney Plus Australia uploaded a rapid-fire video of all the content coming to the service locally, we've updated our list of the best TV shows with a few more picks. The Clone Wars makes the cut, and the X-Men Animated Series has suited up for launch. Head to the bottom of the page for our latest recommendations.

Check-in at the House of Mouse with these quality cartoons and kids’ series when Disney Plus launches.

Update: Reviews.org freelancer David Milner has added his top picks to the list (13-17).

When Disney tweeted out its mega list of the TV shows and movies coming to its streaming service Disney Plus on day one, two things were immediately obvious: there’s a movie called The Cat From Outer Space that I’ve somehow never seen, and the TV show department is heavily skewed towards padawans.

That first point will be rectified the meowment I arrive home and the second will begin to change once Disney Plus starts rolling out the original content it’s producing for its stable of mega-franchises (such as Star Wars and Marvel).

Until then, the TV show lineup is going to be a trip down memory lane for most, as they introduce their own little ones to the magic of 90s cartoons and early 00s live-action Disney.

For those taking advantage of the Disney Plus free trial on day one, we’ve rounded up the best Disney Plus TV shows you will be able to check out.

1. Gargoyles (1994)

Rock-hard

Despite only running for two years, Disney’s animated series about Scottish Gargoyles in the Big Apple has cemented itself as one of the coolest kids shows from the early 90s.

After a centuries-old curse is lifted, Gargoyle godfather Goliath and his band of scrappy statues make it their duty to protect the streets of New York at night.

According to /Film, Jordan Peele (Get Out) pitched a live-action remake back in 2018 so now could be a good time to rewaken your fandom.

2. Gravity Falls (2012)

Baby’s First Twin Peaks

Gravity Falls is a rare example of a kids’ show that starts a quiet life in the mix with every other cartoon before snowballing into a cult phenomenon, like Adventure Time or, more recently, Steven Universe.

When Dipper and Mabel Pines (Jason Ritter and Kristen Schaal) are forced to spend their summer with their Grunkle Stan in Gravity Falls, they are sucked into solving the small town’s many mysteries.

The series was conceived with a core principle in mind: that animation doesn’t have to be ‘just for kids’ and it nails it. This is a cartoon that the whole family will enjoy.

3. The Simpsons (1989)

Television! Teacher! Mother! Secret lover.

As the longest-running scripted primetime television series in America, you’d think The Simpsons’ back catalogue would have been easier to track down on streaming services but that’s never been the case here in Australia.

Disney Plus will mark the first time Australians will have access to the entire back catalogue and binging through Springfield’s golden years is going to be a big reason many will sign up to Disney Plus on day one.

4. Recess (1997)

Whomps

This long-running series depicts elementary school as a small civilisation, complete with a reigning monarch, King Bob (sixth grader).

Schoolyard chums T.J., Spinelli, Mikey, Vince, Gretchen and Gus are freedom fighters resisting the oppressive tyranny of Principal Prickly and (ugh) Miss Finster

5. TRON: Uprising (2012)

Greetings, Programs!

2010’s long-awaited sequel to TRON (1982) divided opinions. It was a super flashy sequel to a classic that’s charm was specifically its retro view of computer programming.

Still, the main thing is that it was fun and painted Jeff Bridges as the techno Jesus he was born to play.

The animated follow-up series TRON: Uprising is less divisive: it’s a bonafide banger that extends the Tron’s lore with an incredibly unique and contemporary art-style.

6. Darkwing Duck (1991)

A plucky perp that fits the bill

In the early 90s, before Batman: The Animated Series even aired, Disney took its own quack at creating a cartoon caped crusader with the seminal Darkwing Duck.

The animated parody of early superhero and spy fiction, Darkwing Duck follows the fame-hungry Drake Mallard and his titular alter ego as he balances crime-fighting by night and suburban life by day in an anthropomorphic parody of Gotham City.

7. Lizzie McGuire (2001)

Silly Duffer

Watching Lizzie McGuire was one of the most formative television experiences a young teenager could have.

If you didn’t have Hilary Duff’s guiding hand to help you transition out of the 90s and into the terrifying 2000s, you’re probably still walking around with a Sony Ericcson flip phone and a pair of wrap-around shades.

It’s a perfect time to take a stroll down memory lane too as Disney Plus is reviving the show with Hilary Duff returning to the iconic role.

8. TaleSpin (1990)

The bear necessities of aviation

Another one from Saturday Disney’s glory days, TaleSpin is an animated series that takes characters from The Jungle Book, such as Baloo and Shere Khan, to new heights.

Where Darkwing Duck is Disney’s early attempt at the superhero genre, TaleSpin is its anthropomorphic take on the same action-adventure classics that inspired Indiana Jones.

9. Bonkers (1993)

Once Upon a Time in Toon Town

Bonkers is what you get if you take Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and remove the live-action parts, Bob Hoskins and the rampant horniness.

In the world of Bonkers, the titular is an ex-cartoon superstar who takes up work as a cop in Hollywood. The twist is that Bonkers is (enthusiastically) partnered with a Detective Lucky Piquel, a cop with no time for toons. Bonkers is a buddy-cop comedy inspired by movies like Lethal Weapon and 48 Hrs.

10. That’s So Raven (2003)

First-name basis

In the early 2000s, celebrities were typically billed with their first and last name e.g. “Brad” and “Pitt” or “Cory” and “In The House” but that was a time before the trailblazing star of Disney’s supernatural sitcom, That’s So Raven.

Raven, just Raven, revolutionised traditional naming conventions by implying that she was the most important Raven in the world. Raven ran so Bono and Beyonce could fly.

11. Goof Troop (1992)

Hyuck

Everybody remembers the 1995 classic A Goofy Movie but tend to forget where it all began: the 1992 series, Goof Troop.

This animated series introduced the effortlessly cool Max Goof, the Goofs’ intense rivalry with Peter Pete Sr., and Goofy’s full name, G.G Goof. Hyuk

12. Star Wars Rebels (2014)

Rebel Rebel

A CG series based on the Star Wars prequels sounded like a terrible idea at the time but somehow, showrunner Dave Filoni managed to pull it off, creating a series that’s more beloved than the source material itself. Then in 2014, Filoni and co. released Star Wars Rebels; knocking the Marksman-H out of the park once again.

Set fourteen years after Revenge of the Sith, Star Wars Rebels follows a ragtag group of rebels aboard a covert ops starship known as Ghost. Where Clone Wars was partially hamstrung by the events that throughout the prequel trilogy, Rebels was free to explore some of the wider Star Wars lore only seen before in comics and novels.

13. Star Wars: The Clone Wars

Ani-mated

Though not as consistent or as moving as Rebels, The Clone Wars, at its best, is essential viewing for Star Wars fans (we’d recommend finding a good episode guide and skipping the filler).

Set between Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith, a galaxy in fresh turmoil provides rich ground for drama. Both Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi are given greater depth than their cinematic counterparts, but the real star is Ahsoka Tano, Anakin’s Padawan.

From Yoda’s journey to learn about life after death through the Force, to the Clone Troopers that discover their dormant Order 66 programming before it’s too late, there’s great canonical Star Wars tales to explore.

14. X-Men: The Animated Series

Dunna nanna naaahh nah nuh!

For people of a certain age, X-Men: The Animated Series is the definitive version of Marvel’s spandex-clad super mutants.

With a stellar line-up of revolving heroes and villains, the show wasn’t afraid to dive deep into the X-Men bench, making stars of then lesser know characters like Gambit and Archangel. It was also surprisingly dark: to this day I’m still haunted by an image of Wolverine’s skeleton from the Days of Future Past arc.

Also, there’s that theme song, which you now have stuck in your head, sorry.

15. Ducktales

Another theme song that slaps

Speaking of theme songs… DuckTales has the alpha jam. The hook that all others aspire to. A god amongst lesser mortal bops. Having access to that bouncy bassline at the touch of a button is going to change lives. Possibly not for the better. But it’s not all about the earworm.

Based on the bizarre premise that Donald Duck’s nephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie go to stay with the insanely wealthy Scrooge McDuck while Donald ships off to join the US Navy (seriously), DuckTales was a bonafide cultural phenomenon for Disney. All four seasons and the spin-off movie Treasure of the Lost Lamp are present and accounted for.

16. Spider-Man (1994)

The best on the web

There’s a confusing amount of Spider-Man cartoons on Disney Plus, seven by our count, but the pick of the bunch is easily the 1994 iteration.

Across five seasons and 65 episodes, Spider-Man took on the likes of Kraven the Hunter and Doc Ock, all while needing to get Peter Parker’s homework submitted on time. It might seem standard practice nowadays, but the producers of Spider-Man made the ground-breaking decision to follow a single storyline across an entire season, meaning larger, grander arcs from the comics were able to play out on Saturday morning TV screens across the world.

It’s not as meme-able as the corny 1966 cartoon, but it’s infinitely better.

17. Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers

A little detective work

After the runaway success of DuckTales in the late 1980s, Disney commissioned more big-budget animation to bulk out the line-up hoping lightning would strike again. Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers is the result (alongside other entrants on this list, Darkwing Duck and TaleSpin).

The premise is as old as time itself: two chipmunks form their own detective agency, solve crimes, and semi-regularly need to take Fat Cat, a mafia don that’s also… a cat, down a rung or two. It’s fun, light-hearted, and no slouch in the theme song department either.

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