Report: New Nintendo Switch will use faster Nvidia DLSS chip

Another week, another report on the new Nintendo Switch.

Brodie Fogg
Editorial Lead
Read More
March 24, 2021
1 min read
Nintendo Switch

Following up on its recent report on the new Nintendo Switch’s 7-inch OLED display, Bloomberg has had another chat with “multiple people familiar with the matter,” to bring us more juicy details on the upcoming console upgrade. According to the report, the New Nintendo Switch Pro (rumoured name) will house an upgraded NVIDIA chip that supports DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling) to achieve an upscaled 4K resolution for TV output.

The report also suggests the upgraded Switch’s new chipset will offer better CPU and increased memory. Bloomberg has also reported that Nintendo is planning to release a number of high-profile games alongside the new Switch that will be designed to take advantage of the new hardware.

Lastly, and importantly, the latest information from Bloomberg suggests that Nintendo is targeting a “year-end shopping season” release. It doesn’t specifically say this year, mind you, but that’s to be assumed. That release window lines up with Bloomberg’s report from August 2020, which first detailed the potential 4K upgrade.

Bloomberg has always been a reliable source for industry insider news but it's important to remember that everything we think we know about the Nintendo Switch comes from "multiple people familiar with the matter," which says nothing of the anonymous source's position or access. So take this information with a grain of salt.

What is DLSS?

DLSS (deep learning super sampling) is Nvidia’s proprietary image upscaling technology that’s used in high-end graphics cards (GeForce RTX 20 and RTX 30) that uses a deep learning algorithm to increase the resolution of low-quality images in real-time. Because it’s not trying to output a higher resolution like 4K natively, the graphics card doesn’t have to do as much heavy lifting, leaving bandwidth for higher frame rates and other advanced graphical settings.

Like ray tracing, DLSS is an AI-solution to a hardware limitation. In short, it would allow the new Nintendo Switch to upscale 1080p video to 4K when docked in TV mode without requiring the same resources as a native 4K device (e.g. PlayStation 5).

It’s the same principle that the Nvidia TV Shield Pro works on to upscale standard and high-definition content to 4K, except a much more advanced technology. Which is saying something, because even the Nvidia TV Shield Pro’s 4K upscaling is impressive.

Here’s an example of what DLSS upscaling looks like in action.

Play Video
Brodie Fogg
Written by
Brodie Fogg
Brodie Fogg is the Australian editorial lead at Reviews.org. He has covered consumer tech, telecommunications, video games, streaming and entertainment for over five years at websites like WhistleOut and Finder and can be found sharing streaming recommendations at 7NEWS every month.

Related Articles

Sony WHXM5 comparison header
Sony WH-1000 XM5 vs XM4: New looks, more microphones
Here's a quick summary of the biggest upgrades coming to Sony’s next set of noise-cancelling...
Daily Deals - Galaxy Z Flip 3
Daily Deals: Discounts on headphones, cameras and more
Your daily dose of the best tech deals available in Australia.
Commbank app
CommBank customers get an exclusive discount on these NBN plans
Dollarmites assemble! More Telecom has partnered with the Commonwealth Bank to give customers 30% off...
Galaxy A53 5G
Samsung Galaxy A53 review: Just right
Samsung's Galaxy A53 5G is a good phone for a good price.