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Samsung’s 2023 TV lineup has a big OLED-sized hole in it

Samsung's new Neo QLED TVs are ready for showtime.

Fergus Halliday
Mar 08, 2023
Icon Time To Read2 min read

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Samsung has a lot to say about its new lineup of 4K and 8K TVs, but nothing for those holding out for the QD-OLED models it showed off at this year's CES.

As usual, the brand's 2023 roster of TVs can be broken down in two main ways. The first is by resolution. Of the four models coming to Australia this year, just one is 8K. There's no successor to last year's cheaper QN800B.

Another way to spin it is by display tech. The Samsung QN60C QLED TV that sits at the bottom end of the catalogue is the only non-Neo QLED option this time around. That means you get non of the Mini-LED backlighting found in the rest of the range, but you do have the chance to save a chunk of change.

No matter which way you slice it though, there's no mention of Samsung's next set of QN-OLED TVs. For now anyway. Last year's Samsung OLED TVs arrived a few months after the bulk of the company's 2022 lineup. It's entirely possible that a similar strategy could be in place for 2023.

According to Jeremy Senior, the vice president for consumer electronics at Samsung Australia, the screen technology involved is less important than the shifting role of the biggest screen within most Australian homes.

"We see the role of TVs in 2023 as being a central hub for monitoring and controlling the multitude of digital devices in the home," he said.

Senior pitched the integrated Samsung Smart Hub found in this year's crop of QLED and Neo QLED models as the missing piece that completes the brand's vision of a personalised and convenient home entertainment experience possible.

Of course, the other big addition here is the new Neural Quantum Processor. Found inside this year's Samsung TVs, this new chip promises to provide better upscaling across both 4K and 8K models by way of 14-bit processing and improved AI tech.

One important detail that's not going to immedietely apparent to consumers is that while all of Samsung's new Neo QLED TVs have the same Neural Quantum Processor, the 8K models have access to a slightly enhanced neural network that's used for image processing. That makes some sense since they're going to be working with a lot more pixels than their 4K siblings.

Nevertheless, it does complicate the simple story that Samsung is telling here. Every QLED and Neo QLED runs on the Neural Quantum Processor, but the one in the QN900C is still the best of the bunch.

Samsung 2023 TVs

Colour is another callout this time around. This year's Neo QLED and QLED TVs have been vetted for colour accuracy by Pantone and are capable of zhushing up non-HDR content in real-time.

Last but not least, Samsung's latest lot of living room centrepieces are also kitted out with the same suite of features seen in last year's lineup. That list includes things like Dolby Atmos speakers and Object Tracking Sound+.

How much do Samsung 2023 TVs cost in Australia?

For a full breakdown of how Samsung has priced its new Neo QLED 4K TVs, check out the table below.

Samsung 2023 TV Model
Size
Australian price
QN90C85-inches$7,899
QN90C75-inches$6,159
QN90C65-inches$4,649
QN90C55-inches$3,489
QN90C50-inches$2,899
QN90C43-inches$2,319
QN85C85-inches$6,999
QN85C75-inches$5,199
QN85C55-inches$4,079
QN85C55-inches$3,149
QN60C85-inches$4,619
QN60C75-inches$2,889
QN60C65-inches$2,189
QN60C55-inches$1,729

If you fancy an 8K model instead, you're going to pay a little bit more than would have for last year's equivalent. Take a look at the table below for a full breakdown of how much one of Samsung’s new 8K TVs is going to cost you.

Samsung 2023 8K TV Model
Size
Australian price
QN900C85-inches$12,699
QN900C75-inches$9,879
QN900C65-inches$7,549

Samsung’s 2023 4K and 8K Neo QLED TVs will be able to be found via most major Australian retailers from this week.

Fergus Halliday
Written by
Fergus Halliday
Fergus Halliday is a Digital Content Editor for Reviews.org who specialises in technology, entertainment, gaming and pop culture. His work has been published in Gizmodo, Kotaku, Press Start Australia, The AU Review, Screen Rant, Superjump and more. You can follow him on Twitter.

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