Nokia phones compared

Nokia phones
Pictured: Nokia 8210 4G
// Do Nokia phones still offer good value?
Alex Kidman
Oct 31, 2023
Icon Time To Read8 min read

We live in a world dominated largely by Apple and Samsung when it comes to our phone buying choices – but it wasn’t always this way. At one time, if you had a phone in your pocket, it was – depending on whose figures you read – pretty much a 50/50 bet that it would be a Nokia phone.

That was in the days of the feature phone, just before Apple changed everything with the iPhone. The intervening years haven’t been kind to Nokia’s market share, but it’s still perfectly feasible to buy Nokia phones – and that’s both for lovers of affordable smartphones and feature phones alike. This guide will take you through what’s available, what to look for and a whole host of frequently asked Nokia questions. Let’s get started.

Nokia phones aren’t “Nokia” phones… sort of.

The first concept to wrap your head around when looking at Nokia branded phones is that they’re no longer actualy made by Nokia Networks, the company that made all those classic late 90s-early-2000s handsets. Nokia got out of the handset business entirely in 2013, though not out of the networking side of the business; plenty of Australia’s mobile infrastructure – notably a lot of Optus and Vodafone’s networks – run on Nokia hardware that way.

So how come there are Nokia-branded phones you can buy? Nokia Networks – the Finnish networking company – licensed out the Nokia brand to a company called HMD Global, run by… a bunch of former Nokia phone executives. HMD Global has held the licensing rights to Nokia phones since 2016, producing a range of affordable Android smartphones as well as very low cost feature phones, many of them incorporating classic throwback Nokia designs and model names.

All prices and specifications are as per Nokia Australia’s site in October 2023, or standard retail pricing where direct pricing was not available. As always, prices you pay for actual handsets can vary over time, so it’s smart to shop around to get the best deals on any Nokia phone.

Nokia feature phones compared


Nokia Flip 2660 Flip

Some people don’t like the complexity of smartphones – or the way those pesky social media apps take over their lives – and yearn for a simpler mobile phone time when they took calls, sent texts and maybe distracted you just a teensy tiny bit with a few games of Snake. That’s where Nokia’s feature phone line shines, offering decent value for consumers wanting a much simpler phone experience.

Nokia 105 4G


Nokia 105 4G
Starts at
$69
outright
Key specs
1.8 inch screen, 1450mAh battery, Charcoal or Ocean Blue colours

Nokia’s cheapest feature phone costs less than some monthly phone plans (if you’re not shopping around, which you should be, and it’s a very basic unit designed primarily for calls and texts, with no camera onboard. It’s also certainly the cheapest phone we’ve ever seen with a level of rated water resistance, though at IP52 it would be unwise to dunk it entirely in your soup.

Nokia 110 4G


Nokia 110 4G
Starts at
$79
outright
Key specs
6.9 inch internal display, 3.6 inch external display, Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 processor, 3,800mAh battery, 12MP/13MP dual rear cameras, 32MP selfie camera, IP52 dust/water resistance.

The Nokia 110 4G is a basic phone at a very basic price, though Nokia does pitch it as a good option for those who want that more premium Nokia “feel” and HD voice capabilities. It’s essentially the Nokia 105 4G on steroids, given the inclusion of an actual camera, though at QVGA resolution it’s not a good camera at a specifications level at least.

Nokia 8210 4G


Nokia 8210 4G
Starts at
$117
outright
Key specs
2.8 inch internal display, 1450mAh battery, 0.3MP camera, Sand, Red or Dark Blue colours

A lot of people bought the Nokia 8210 back in the day, so it was a bit of an obvious option for HMD Global to revive. The revived Nokia 8210 keeps the original’s light weight at 107g – bearing in mind you can easily buy smartphones that weigh double that – and a range of colour styles – but it’s otherwise a very simple feature phone for the market that loves feature phones.

Nokia 2660 Flip


Nokia 2660 Flip
Starts at
$149
outright
Key specs
2.8 inch internal display, 1450mAh battery, 2MP camera, KaiOS apps, Pop Pink or Lush Green or Blue or Black or Red colours

The 2660 Flip harkens back to classic flip phones of the pre-smartphone era, with the full satisfaction of flipping the screen shut to close off a call very much present. It’s also very unusual in the feature phone space purely by dint of coming in so very many colour choices. Typically feature phones are a bit like the classic Ford Model T, in that you can have them in any colour you like – as long as it’s black.

Want to know more about the Nokia 2660 Flip? Read our full Nokia 2660 Flip review here.

Nokia 5710 XA


Nokia 5710 XA
Starts at
$149
outright
Key specs
2.4 inch internal display, 1450mAh battery, 0.3MP camera, Included wireless headphones, Black or White colours

If you think that innovation is purely for the smartphone space… well, somebody at HMD Global had other ideas. The Nokia 5710 XA’s party piece is literally a party piece, at least for your own personal music listening party. It’s got a smaller screen that other Nokia feature phones, but that’s to allow the top of the phone to house wireless Bluetooth headphones that pop out when you need them and then store back and charge when you don’t. That’s not a concept that will fly with everyone – but it’s certainly different!

Nokia smartphones compared


Nokia smartphones

Nokia G42 5G


Nokia G42 5G
Starts at
$449
outright
Key specs
6.56 inch display, 50MP/2MP rear cameras, 5,000mAh battery, Snapdragon 480 processor, 6GB RAM, 128GB storage, So Pink, So Purple, So Grey Colours

The Nokia G42 5G’s particular calling card is that it’s repairable. OK, every phone technically is repairable, but typically that’s got to be done by authorised repair agents or phone manufacturers get all sniffy about the warranty being voided. Not so the Nokia G42, a phone that HMD Global is happy to guide you through repairing lest the worst happen.

Nokia XR21


Nokia XR21
Starts at
$749
outright
Key specs
6.49 inch display, 64MP/8MP rear cameras, 4,800mAh battery, Snapdragon 695 processor, 6GB RAM, 128GB storage, Midnight Black or Pine Green Colours

If you don’t fancy repairing the Nokia G42, there’s always the Nokia XR21, a seriously rugged, heavy duty Android phone that’s been designed specifically to take many of life’s crueller knocks and just keep on going. If you work in hazardous environments – or you’re just naturally clumsy – it could be a better fit than walking around with a smartphone with a smashed screen all day.

Nokia C32


nokia c32
Starts at
$249
outright
Key specs
6.52 inch display, 50MP/2MP rear cameras, 5,050mAh battery, Unisoc SC9863A1 processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage, Beach Pink or Charcoal or Autumn Green Colours

The Nokia C32 is one of HMD Global’s cheaper phones to run on full Android instead of Android Go, and it’s a decent example of where HMD Global has increasingly focused its smartphone efforts. It’s a no-fuss effort built to a price point, as so many of its smartphones are.

Nokia X30


Nokia X30
Starts at
$799
outright
Key specs
6.43 inch display, 50MP/13MP rear cameras, 4,200mAh battery, Snapdragon 695 processor, 6/8GB RAM, 128/256GB storage, Cloudy Blue Colour

The Nokia X30’s big point of difference within its more premium priced range is that it’s made of recycled and recyclable materials, making it an option for the more eco-concerned phone buyer.

Nokia C12


Nokia C12
Starts at
$199
outright
Key specs
6.3 inch display, 5MP rear camera, 3000mAh removable battery, Unisoc 9863A1 processor, 2GB RAM, 64GB storage, Dark Cyan or Charcoal or Light Mint Colour

The sub-$200 price point of the Nokia C12 places it truly in the budget category, but budget phones don’t have to be bad phones per se. It’s one of only a handful of Android phones you can buy from anyone that has a removeable battery, for a start.

Nokia G22


Nokia G22
Starts at
$299
outright
Key specs
6.52 inch display, 50/2/2 MP rear cameras, 5050mAh battery, Unisoc T606 processor, 4GB RAM, 128GB storage, Lagoon Blue or Meteor Grey Colour

The G22 is best described as “the Nokia X30 but cheaper”, in that its big selling point is the use of recycled materials in its construction.

Nokia C02


Nokia C02
Starts at
$169
outright
Key specs
.45 inch display, 5MP rear camera, 3000mAh removable battery, Spreadtrum SC9832E processor, 2GB RAM, 32GB storage, Dark Cyan or Charcoal Colour

The Nokia C02 is a more basic phone option, running the more optimised Android Go platform, though it’s Android 12 Go, which is getting a little long in the tooth now.

Nokia C31


Nokia C31
Starts at
$159
outright
Key specs
6.75 inch display, 13/2/2MP rear cameras, 5000mAh battery, Unisoc SC9863A processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage, Charcoal Grey Colour

The Nokia C31’s a slightly older Nokia model – it’s an Android 12 phone for a start – pitched around its triple camera array, though it’s worth noting that one of those lenses is purely a focusing lens; you’ll only ever shoot with its primary 13MP sensor or 2MP macro lens.

Nokia G60 5G


Nokia G60 5G
Starts at
$549
outright
Key specs
6.58 inch display, 50/5/2MP rear cameras, 4500mAh battery, Snapdragon 695 processor, 6GB RAM, 128GB storage, Black or Ice Colour

If you want a little networking futureproofing in your life, there’s the Nokia G60 5G – although it’s worth noting that you don’t have to pay a fortune just for 5G any more. 

Nokia G11 Plus


Nokia G11 Plus
Starts at
$229
outright
Key specs
6.52 inch display, 50/2MP rear cameras, 5000mAh battery, Unisoc T606 processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage, Black or Ice Colour

There’s only a handful of Nokia phones in Australia that are telco-specific models, and the G11 Plus is one of them; you can get it as an outright handset through Telstra.

Nokia C2 2nd Edition


nokia c2 2nd edition
Starts at
$179
outright
Key specs
5.7 inch display, 5MP rear camera, 2400mAh removeable battery, MediaTek MT6739 processor, 2GB RAM, 32GB storage, Grey Colour

The C2 2nd Edition is yet another simple, relatively affordable Nokia/HMD Global handset; the kind of phone that they typically do well.

Nokia G21


Nokia G21
Starts at
$299
outright
Key specs
6.5 inch display, 50/2/2MP rear cameras, 5050mAh battery, Unisoc T606 processor, 4GB RAM, 128GB storage, Dusk or Nordic Blue Colour

The Nokia G21 is an older HMD Global handset, and while its specifications were decent for its time, we wouldn’t advise paying that full RRP for it now – definitely one for bargain hunters more than anything else now.

Nokia G20


nokia g20
Starts at
$229
outright
Key specs
6.5 inch display, 48/5/2/2MP rear cameras, 5050mAh battery, Mediatek Helio G35 processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage, Night Colour

Another slightly older Nokia/HDM Global phone, best purchased if you can score one at a decent discount.

Nokia XR20


xr20
Starts at
$699
outright
Key specs
6.67 inch display, 48/13MP rear cameras, 4630mAh battery, Snapdragon 480 processor, 6GB RAM, 128GB storage, Granite or Ultra Blue Colour

The XR21’s predecessor is pretty much just as tough, which is great, but as it’s the older phone, again, look for bargains if you want a ruggedised handset.

Nokia C30


Nokia C30
Starts at
$137
outright
Key specs
6.82 inch display, 13/2MP rear cameras, 6000mAh battery, Unisoc SC9863A processor, 2GB RAM, 32GB storage, Dark Grey Colour

Again, a much older Nokia handset – it originally launched with Android 11 – so while it can be had for cheap right now, there’s a very obvious reason for that.

Nokia C01 Plus


nokia c01 plus
Starts at
$157
outright
Key specs
5.45 inch display, 5MP rear camera, 3000mAh removable battery, Unisoc SC9863A processor, 2GB RAM, 16GB storage, Blue or Purple Colour

A nice low price for the C01 Plus, but this is a basic and somewhat old Nokia phone, so the smart play here is to ensure you can get it at even more of a discount.

Can I still use a classic Nokia phone in Australia? Should I buy one?

Broadly speaking, no – or at least not the phone and messaging functions for the most part.

Most of the true classic Nokias were 2G phones, and 2G networks haven’t been active in Australia since 2018 at the latest.

Even for those slightly-less-ancient models that did incorporate 3G, you’re living on borrowed time at best, with Telcos getting ready to shut down their networks within the next year or so.

So while they might have interesting industrial design, they’re perhaps best suited these days as collectors pieces – you can find them pretty easily on eBay if you’re keen -- or maybe to see if you can beat your all-time Snake score, and not much more.

Can Nokia feature phones run apps?

Mostly yes – with a very limited definition of apps. Nokia’s feature phones don’t use Google’s Android but instead system specific operating systems with just a few apps – typically Facebook, Snake and a few other games – available to install and configure. Using apps like Facebook on a T9 predictive text keyboard isn’t impoo

I thought Microsoft bought Nokia?

Microsoft didn’t buy Nokia Networks entirely, but it did buy out Nokia’s phone business back in 2014 as part of its push for Windows Phone, including naming rights for Nokia phones.

Microsoft mostly focused on Lumia-branded premium smartphones, leaving the Nokia brand for simpler cheaper phones – but not for all that long. By 2016 the writing was on the wall for Windows Phone, and with it, Microsoft’s taste for owning a mobile phone company. That’s when HMD Global stepped in to buy the feature phone business and naming rights through to at least 2024.

Alex Kidman
Written by
Alex Kidman
Alex Kidman is some kind of word-generating AI from the future that somehow worked out how to sneak back in time to 1998 to start its journalism career. Across that time, including editorial stints at ZDNet, CNET, Gizmodo, PC Mag and Finder, as well as contributions to every major tech masthead, nobody has quite managed to figure out this deeply held secret. Let’s keep it between us, OK?

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