Are robot vacuum cleaner mops any good?

Moptimus Prime.

Georgia Dixon
Digital Content Editor
Read More
April 20, 2021
2 min read

We are committed to sharing unbiased reviews. Some of the links on our site are from our partners who compensate us. Read our disclosure policies to learn more.

There are some household chores we try to do as infrequently as possible, and others we have no choice but to do on a regular basis, like vacuuming and cleaning the toilet. Mopping, however, tends to fall to the wayside unless there’s a major mess or spill to clean up. So, now that more and more robot vacuum cleaners are also offering mopping functionality, the question stands: do they actually do a good job?

What is a robot mop?

For the purposes of this guide, when we talk about robot mops, we’re generally referring to robot vacuum cleaners that double as mops. While there are some standalone robot mops, they’re much more common as an attachment for robot vacuums, and usually represent better value and more convenience.

How do robot mops work?

Robot mops work much the same way as robot vacuum cleaners, cleaning in a pre-programmed pattern. Since they use the same sensors as their robovac half, their navigation abilities depend on whether or not they have the ability to map the layout of your home, or simply run until they hit a wall or obstacle.

Hybrid robot vacuum/mops typically have a separate wiping attachment and a water reservoir which will need to be filled to a certain level before it begins cleaning. Unfortunately, given space is tight, having a mop function (and thus a water reservoir) will take precious room away from the vacuum dustbin, meaning you’ll have to empty it more often than you would a standalone robot vacuum.

It’s also important to note that most robot vacuum mops work using only water and the compatible wipe attachment - you can’t add any disinfectant or cleaning product to the water reservoir.

You’ll also have to regularly wash any mopping wipes regularly, however, it appears one Kickstarter project is attempting to do away with even that. Narwal claims to be the world’s first self-cleaning robot vacuum and mop. It can wash and dry its own mop attachments and even refill itself when the water tank is running low. It’s currently only available in the US (for the eye watering price of US$1,099, around AU$1,400), but still worth keeping an eye on.

Can robot mops tell the difference between hard floors and carpet?

It depends on the make and model of your robot vacuum cleaner, but generally speaking, spending more money will get you a unit that knows to avoid mopping on carpet and rugs. Cheaper models will need a little bit more babysitting (or be shut in a room completely) in order to avoid spraying water all over your carpet.

For example, we tested the $399 Ecovacs Deebot U2 and the $1,199 Ecovacs Deebot T8+. The more expensive model, as you might expect, was able to stop mopping as soon as it approached carpet. The cheaper unit, on the other hand, needed a little human intervention to get the job done.

Can robot mops replace manual mopping?

Realistically, no. Just like a robot vacuum will never be able to do quite as good a job as you and your old upright, neither can a robo mop. Having a robot vacuum/mop hybrid in the house will make your life easier and cut down on how often you have to mop manually, but it won’t replace elbow grease entirely. That’s partly because you can’t use cleaning products with them, and partly because they’re not capable of using as much pressure as us superior humans.

Where can I get a robot mop? And how much do they cost?

Most of the usual robot vacuum suspects have also dipped their feet in the mopping biz. Ecovacs, Roborock and Xiaomi all make hybrid models, however, iRobot (the maker of the famous Roomba) only make standalone robot vacs and standalone robot mops (called the iRobot Braava). To get both vacuuming and mopping functions, you’ll need to fork out a minimum of $399, with prices reaching $1,299.

You can find most of these brands at Amazon, The Good Guys, Godfreys, JB Hi-Fi and other electronics retailers.

Georgia Dixon
Written by
Georgia Dixon
Georgia Dixon has over seven years' experience writing about all things tech, entertainment and lifestyle, with bylines in TechLife magazine, 7NEWS and Stuff.co.nz. In her spare time, you'll find her playing games and daydreaming about good food, wine, and dogs.

Related Articles

Creative Sound Blaster Katana V2 review
Creative Sound Blaster Katana V2 review
The Creative Sound Blaster Katana V2 is an incredibly versatile soundbar with big bass and...
Graphic of family using internet | Best NBN plans available
The best NBN plans and NBN deals available (September 2022)
The place to visit each month if you want to know the latest and greatest...
JoJo All Star Battle R header
JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: All-Star Battle R tries to balance modern touches with big omissions
An archaic anime fighter that goes big when it should have gone bold.
Photograph of a woman with pink hair using her SIM-only plan on her smartphone
The best SIM Only plans available in Australia (September 2022)
Your one-stop shop for the best SIM Only plans in Australia.