AT&T Internet Review

AT&T has well-priced internet plans, though its fiber internet is the true pick of the litter.
Best for Fiber
PlanPriceDownload speedDetails
Internet Basic 5$40/mo.5 MbpsView Plan
Internet 100$50/mo.100 MbpsView Plan
Internet 300$70/mo.300 MbpsView Plan
Internet 1000$70/mo.1000 MbpsView Plan
PriceDownload speedDetails
$40/mo.5 MbpsView Plan
$50/mo.100 MbpsView Plan
$70/mo.300 MbpsView Plan
$70/mo.1000 MbpsView Plan

AT&T’s internet plans don’t offer many choices for speed, but sometimes that’s not a bad thing. You’ll likely find more value packed into its fiber plans—though we think you can’t go wrong with the Internet 10–100 DSL plan, either.

Keep reading to find out which AT&T internet plans pack the most punch when it comes to value, speed, data caps, contracts, and features. Buckle up!

AT&T broadband internet prices and plans comparison
PlanPriceDownload speedUpload speedDetails
Internet Basic 5$40/mo.*5 Mbps1 MbpsView Plan
Internet 10-100$50/mo.*100 Mbps20 MbpsView Plan
Internet 100$50/mo.*100 Mbps100 MbpsView Plan
Internet 300$70/mo.*300 Mbps300 MbpsView Plan
Internet 1000$70/mo.*1000 Mbps1000 MbpsView Plan
Data effective 11/19/18. Offers and availability vary by location and are subject to change.
* For the first 12 months with a 1-year agreement.

Pros

  • Well-priced fiber plans
  • Option to bundle with DIRECTV

Cons

  • Limited availability for fiber plans
  • Data caps for speeds under 1,000 Mbps

Find out which AT&T internet plans are available near you.

AT&T internet prices and plans

AT&T’s Internet 10–100, Internet 100, and Internet 300 plans come fully loaded.

You may have already noticed that AT&T offers two types of internet: fiber plans and DSL plans. Which type you can get largely depends on where you live, and chances are if you don’t live in a big metro area, you’ll have only the DSL option.

We always say if you can get fiber, go for it, and we stick by that motto with AT&T internet. But if all you’re seeing are AT&T DSL plans, rest assured that we think the Internet 10–100 plan is a pretty good deal too.

Here’s how the cookie crumbles when you look at each internet plan—plus how AT&T’s prices and speeds compare to other internet providers.

Heads Up icon
How much speed do you actually need?
Do you really need 1,000 Mbps of blazing fast internet? Probably not, but you should still know how much internet speed you should be paying for. Find out how much internet speed you really need in our easy Mbps guide.

DSL internet plans

It only takes a quick glance to see that you get more for your money with AT&T’s Internet 10–100 plan.

In fact, the price for the Internet Basic 5 plan runs higher than the low-speed plans from other internet service providers (ISPs)—and those still offer a few more Mbps to keep those web pages loading.

AT&T Internet DSL prices and plans
PlanPriceDownload speedUpload speedDetails
Internet Basic 5$40/mo.*5 Mbps1 MbpsView Plan
Internet 10-100$50/mo.*100 Mbps20 MbpsView Plan
Data effective 11/19/18. Offers and availability vary by location and are subject to change.
* For the first 12 months with a 1-year agreement.

But if you peeked ahead to the AT&T Fiber section, you probably already know what we’re about to say next.

If you can get the AT&T Fiber Internet 100 plan, go for that over the Internet 10–100 DSL plan.

Why? Because you’re guaranteed 100 Mbps speeds with the fiber plan, but the DSL plan promises to get you the fastest speeds in your area. Which could range anywhere from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps.

Info Box icon
How does DSL internet service compare to cable?
Both DSL and cable internet connect you to the internet thanks to copper wires. But while DSL carries data over phone lines, cable typically uses copper cables (hence the name) closer to the ground or even underground.

The not-so-great news: both of these internet connections run into issues the farther you are from your ISP or neighborhood internet node. That’s why we recommend fiber—it uses light technology that doesn’t get as distorted over long distances.

Want to nerd out with us? Check out our fiber internet and cable internet explanations.

Our pick for AT&T DSL: Internet 10–100

Who it’s good for: The Internet 10–100 plan is a good match and worth the money if you and your family are average internet users and can get close to the top-end 100 Mbps speeds. That includes playing Stardew Valley with your friends or your 18-year-old streaming the latest Billie Eilish album while they study.

Why we picked it: AT&T’s price for loading Facebook at 100 Mbps is right in line with other ISPs—and even a little cheaper than some. The one terabyte data cap is a bummer, but most of us will never come close to hitting that ceiling.

Fiber plans

So why go with fiber?

First off, fiber has fewer connection issues. You could say fiber is the most zen internet connection because there’s less chance of your connection freaking out when 20 of your neighbors decide to download a pirated copy of The Lion King all at the same time.

(P.S. We do not condone piracy, the Jack Sparrow kind or the digital kind.)

AT&T Fiber prices and plans
PlanPriceDownload speedUpload speedDetails
Internet 100$50/mo.*100 Mbps100 MbpsView Plan
Internet 300$70/mo.*300 Mbps300 MbpsView Plan
Internet 1000$70/mo.*1000 Mbps1000 MbpsView Plan
Data effective 12/10/18. Offers and availability vary by location and are subject to change.
* For the first 12 months with a 1-year agreement.

Overall, we think AT&T Fiber is a better value than DSL. It’s way faster, and you can choose from a wider variety of speeds—some even at lower prices than the competition.

If you want to max out your speed, AT&T Fiber’s 1,000 Mbps plan is priced on the cheaper end, right along with CenturyLink and Verizon Fios. But boy, does AT&T’s unlimited data cap sure look good—and chances are you need it if you’re gobbling up the interwebz at 1,000 Mbps.

Our pick for AT&T Fiber: Internet 300

Who it’s good for: Got a house full of gamers? Does every member of your family have to stream Chernobyl, Stranger Things, and Star Trek: Discovery all in different rooms? We feel you, and we think the Internet 300 plan will keep those lag and buffering monsters away.

Why we picked it: Most of us don’t need 300 Mbps, but if you’ve got home security devices, smart home tech, streaming devices, gaming platforms, cell phones, and other electronics all connected to your internet even when your entire household isn’t busy gaming and streaming, you probably need the extra oomph.

This fiber plan delivers, and the 300 Mbps speed is priced lower than most. You’ll pay $10 to $25 more for the same speeds with other ISPs. (Mic drop.)

TV + internet bundles

One huge perk you’ll get with AT&T Internet is that bundling can actually save you money. So if you want to follow your favorite sports team throughout the season or get an earful of Gordon Ramsay’s latest creative insults in Hell’s Kitchen, a bundle is the way to go.

You’ll have the choice of bundling your DSL or fiber internet plan with either U-verse (AT&T’s proprietary TV service) or DIRECTV.

Your bundle can also include home phone service, but to keep things simple, we picked out a few of our favorite internet and TV combos to give you a clearer picture.

AT&T TV and internet bundles comparison
PlanPriceInternet download speedTV channel countDetails
DIRECTV CHOICE™ All Included + Internet 10-100$85/mo.100 Mbps185+View Plan
DIRECTV XTRA All Included + Internet 100$95/mo.100 Mbps235+View Plan
DIRECTV PREMIER™ All Included + Internet 300$170/mo.300 Mbps330+View Plan
U-verse U-Family All Included + Internet 10-100$75/mo.100 Mbps180+View Plan
U-verse U300 All Included + Internet 300$120/mo.300 Mbps470+View Plan

Data effective 8/30/2019. Offers and availability vary by location and are subject to change.
*Prices for AT&T internet + DIRECTV are for 12 months with a 2-year TV and 1-year internet contract, paperless billing, and autopay. Price increases for months 13–24.
**Prices for AT&T internet + U-Verse TV bundles require a 1-year contract.

AT&T internet speed and data caps

AT&T internet delivers more speed than what you pay for.

If you want high-speed internet, AT&T’s got you covered. But if that’s a bit more power than you need, you’ll find more options for low-speed plans with providers like CenturyLink, Cox, and Comcast Xfinity.

Broadband internet speed comparison
Download speedsUpload speedsBest for
5 Mbps1 MbpsEmail, general web browsing
50 Mbps5 MbpsCouples and solo users, gaming, streaming music, video, and on Twitch
100 Mbps20 MbpsSmall families, gaming, streaming video and music
300 Mbps100 MbpsGamers, streaming video and music, livestreaming, large families
1,000 Mbps1,000 MbpsGamers, livestreaming, hosting servers, streaming video and music, large families

Yup, AT&T has only two slower speeds, 5 Mbps and 100 Mbps. That’s its main drawback: there’s nothing hiding behind door number three that might appeal to, say, a married couple who work from home, don’t have kids, and stream Hulu a few times a week.

AT&T’s fiber plans do add three more speeds that cater to more types of internet activities.

You’ve got 100 Mbps for the family that watches CBS All Access together, 300 Mbps for the roommates who game and host a LAN party every weekend, and 1,000 Mbps for the 16-year-old Twitch streamer who’s aiming to win the next $3 million Fortnite championship prize.

How fast is AT&T internet, really?

Internet speed is a tricky thing. You see, you don’t always get what you pay for.

But with AT&T internet, we’ve found that it usually delivers the speeds it advertises.

This is what the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) calls actual/advertised speed, and it’s typically measured as a percentage. In the 2018 “Measuring Broadband Across America” report, the FCC analyzed all of the AT&T plans together, and AT&T scored an average actual/advertised speed of 108.9%.1

FCC actual/advertised speed score for AT&T internet 2018
Average actual/advertised speed score
108.9%

That means, according to the FCC, AT&T over-delivered on speed and its customers zoomed along with faster internet than they paid for. Nice.

(Of course, we try to take the FCC’s reports with a grain of salt. The FCC may not have analyzed AT&T internet in your area—or it may not have analyzed the plan you’re eyeing. Sadly, there are gaps in the FCC’s data, so we like to check out other data before we make our final verdict.)

HighSpeedInternet.com also ranked AT&T well in terms of speed. Its most recent report on the fastest internet providers in the US placed AT&T as the second-fastest in the Northeast and the West, and third-fastest in the Midwest and the South.2

HighSpeedInternet.com speed test scores for AT&T internet 2018
RankUS region
2ndNortheast, West
3rdMidwest, South

Data caps

Sadly, only the Internet 1,000 plan pulls out all the stops with an unlimited data cap. All the rest of AT&T’s plans are stuck with a one terabyte cap. (But if it makes you feel better, you’re still leaps and bounds ahead of Viasat’s [formerly Exede satellite internet] max 150 GB data cap.)

Of course, you’re gonna need to do a lot of streaming and downloading to reach that one terabyte cap. A lot.

To put that in perspective, here’s a list of average file sizes (plus one for fun):

Average download file sizes
DownloadFile size
PDF20 KB
eBook3 MB
4-minute song5 MB
2-hour movie2 GB
Video game30 GB
The entire Internet Archive45+ Petabytes (45,000,000 GB)3

If you’re all about unlimited power and a terabyte of data each month just won’t cut it, we won’t judge.

Instead, we’ll point you AT&T’s Internet 1,000 plan. Or, if you tend to eat up lots of data only a few times a year (say, when family comes to visit), you can always add more data to your plan each month. That comes at an additional price, though. And you’re limited to spending $100 (which gets you 500 GB) on extra data a month.

AT&T Internet additional data fees*
Additional dataFee
50 GB$10

Data effective 8/30/2019. Offers and availability vary by location and are subject to change.
*Up to $100, or 500 GB, of additional data each month.

If you can’t land that sweet gig speed deal, there’s also Frontier, Grande, Optimum, or Spectrum, all of which have no data cap on their plans.

Bullhorn icon
Hot tip: Bundle your AT&T internet to get an unlimited data cap
No, seriously. If you bundle your AT&T internet with DIRECTV or U-verse TV, your data cap skyrockets to unlimited. Sweet deal, amirite?

Fees, contracts, and equipment

AT&T scores brownie points for delivering your equipment right to your door.

Contracts

You’ll need to sign a one-year agreement whether you get DSL or fiber, which is kind of a bummer if you ask us. (You hate to see it, right?)

Even Comcast Xfinity offers a few no-contract options for its internet service. We love the freedom a no-contract option gives us, and we hope AT&T decides to hop on the no-contract bandwagon in the future.

Installation and termination fees

Sorry, y’all. There’s no getting away from fees when it comes to internet service, with AT&T or with any other internet provider. Here’s a quick overview of what AT&T might charge you.

  • Installation fees: Pay a $35 activation fee if you prefer DIY installation, or call up the pros for $99.
  • Early termination fee: $15 for each month left on your contract—up to a total of $180.

Equipment and fees

If you sign up for AT&T internet, you’ll get a Wi-Fi gateway modem-and-router combo, so chances are you won’t need your own router to set up your Wi-Fi network.

Light Bulb icon
Can’t get Wi-Fi in every room?
A Wi-Fi extender should do the trick. Check out this TP-Link Wi-Fi extender (that I use in my own home) from Amazon. It won’t cost you more than $30, which is oh-so worth it to stream The Expanse before bed.

It’s also really nice that you can sign up for internet service and have the equipment delivered straight to your door. A buddy of mine, Andrew, did just this while he was staying in Virginia but needed internet set up in his new house in Florida.

“They shipped the box on Monday. It came Wednesday, [and] my girlfriend hooked it up and followed the instructions. The box activated itself, and she was up and running,” he says.

Imagine that: you move in and your internet is set up before you even get your mattress unloaded. Priorities, right?

AT&T internet customer service

AT&T’s customer service ranks well compared to other ISPs—but that’s still low overall.

Customer service always seems to be a pain point for ISPs, and AT&T is no exception. However, it does score 69 out of 100 on the 2019 American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI)—second only to Verizon Fios.4

If you need to get chummy with an AT&T rep, social media or chat may be your best option. Here’s where to find them.

Recap: Is AT&T internet good?

The Internet 10–100 and AT&T Fiber plans offer good value for a competitive price.

AT&T’s internet offers up some competitive pricing and quick speeds. Here’s a quick recap of why you might like it.

  • AT&T’s DSL plans are more widely available and can reach speeds of up to 100 Mbps. If you can get 100 Mbps, the pricing is competitive. But don’t forget that the DSL plans come with a 1 TB data cap—unless you bundle with TV.
  • AT&T Fiber is limited to certain areas, but it’s a great buy if you can get it. It comes in three speeds and the fastest plan has no data cap.
  • AT&T TV and internet bundles can save you some cash and get rid of that pesky data cap. And you get to choose between DIRECTV or U-verse TV. Choices, choices . . .

Still not sure AT&T Internet is for you? Maybe our other internet reviews can help you decide.

FAQ

Q: Where is AT&T Fiber available?

Right now, AT&T Fiber is available at service addresses in 21 states, mostly in the southern and midwestern US:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Nevada
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin

You can check to see if your city has AT&T Fiber on AT&T’s coverage map.

Q: What is AT&T Fixed Wireless?

AT&T’s fixed wireless internet service brings internet to rural areas of the US by beaming your internet connection from an antenna on your roof to a fixed location.

While fixed wireless is certainly an exciting new technology for rural areas missing out on more than one internet option—or areas with no internet options—it isn’t without its downsides.

Weather and landscape, such as trees and hills, can disrupt a fixed wireless connection. And while fixed wireless will typically run you about the same as a DSL or cable connection in cost, it comes with much lower data caps.

The speeds aren’t much to write home about, either. (AT&T’s cap is 170 GB and speeds are 10 Mbps or faster.)

If you’re stuck hitting up the library for its free Wi-Fi, we feel your pain. We recommend giving AT&T Fixed Wireless a look and checking out this list of Wireless Internet Service Providers (WISPs) to see what’s available near you.

Sources

  1. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), “2018 Measuring Broadband Across America: Fixed Broadband Report
  2. HighSpeedInternet.com, “The Fastest Internet Providers 2019
  3. Internet Archive, “About the Internet Archive
  4. American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), “ACSI Telecommunications Report 2018–2019